Charter Yachts Turkey

Schooner
Kayhan 11
Charter Sailing Turkey
On Holiday Cruises

Charter Sailing Turkey

Kayhan 11 is a 112-foot crewed schooner charter sailing Turkey on holiday cruises.
Handcrafted in mahogany and teak, she is powered by twin 450 hp Iveco diesel engines as well as by a full suit of sails. Centers of activity are cushioned midships and quarter decks which can seat twenty-four for alfresco dining under awning. An uncluttered cabin-top affords additional room for sunbathing or lounging in the warmth of the sun. A boarding-ladder provides easy access to and from the sea.

Schooner Sailing Turkey

Charter Sailing Turkey

Schooner Sailing Turkey

Charter Sailing Turkey

Specifications:

Year Built: 2002
Length: 112 ft
Beam: 25 ft
Draft: 10 ft
Engines: (2) 450 hp Iveco
Generators: (2) 45 kva
Electricity: 220 volts
Cruising Speed: 10 knots
Fuel: 3,170 gal
Water: 5,280 gal

Equipment:

Radar
GPS & Autopilot
VHF & Mobile Telephones
CD Stereo System
Television w/DVD Player
Tender with Outboard
Kayak
Marine Air Conditioning
Deep Freeze, Ice Maker
Fishing and Snorkeling Gear

Charter Sailing Turkey

Schooner Sailing Turkey

Of ten guest cabins, six are double-bed suites while four are equipped with twin beds.
All cabins have en-suite bathrooms with enclosed shower stalls, and all cabins are air-conditioned.

Schooner Sailing Turkey

Charter Sailing Turkey

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This page last updated 02/01/2016

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning charter sailing in Turkey may be obtained by clicking on the maroon links immediately above. Thank You. You must be searching for charter sailing or for holiday cruises. Why else would Google point you toward this page! Because you are considering a schooner holiday! Not likely. But you have found a schooner holiday cruising the coast of Turkey, a schooner in this instance being a large fore-and-aft rigged wooden yacht with two masts of equal height. You have found a schooner charter sailing the coast of Turkey from one pine-fringed blue-water cove to the next pine-fringed blue-water cove. You have found a schooner sometimes cruising the coast of Turkey's ancient Lycia, a repository of history replete with white-sand beaches as well as blue-water coves. You have found a schooner at other times cruising the coast of neighboring Caria, another repository of history with its own white-sand beaches and blue-water coves. You could be a part of this! Tracing as you cruise the wakes of Alexander and Cleopatra among others creating history at the crossroads of history. History such as represented by the 4th century BCE temple tombs at Caunos depicted at left, construction of that on the right thought to have been abandoned on rumor of Alexander's imminent arrival. Among others creating history here at the crossroads of history were untold numbers of pirates Schooner Sailing Turkeyand corsairs, the former free-booting outlaws and the latter government-sponsored outlaws. A bare five hundred years ago, as ever, there were corsairs or privateers flying the colors of Islam sailing from Macry, modern Fethiye and home to Kayhan 11, and there were Christian corsairs sailing from Rhodes Town a bare 44 nautical miles distant. These corsairs and others operated both independently of and together with their respective Ottoman and Hospitaller navies. When operating independently they were each wont to raid the other's coastal towns and to intercept merchant shipping of the other faith, enslaving those unfortunate enough to be caught in their nets. In July of 1503 Knights of Rhodes Grand Master Pierre d'Aubusson died, and because his successor Emery d'Amboise had yet to arrive from France, the Hospitaller council feared an Ottoman invasion. The council consequently sent letters to Ottoman Sultan Beyazid II and to his son Prince Korkut, governor of the surrounding province of Antalya. These letters affirming Hospitaller wishes for peaceful relations were dispatched on the great carrack of Rhodes to Physcus, modern Marmaris 25 nautical miles distant, and in a few days Korkut sent the ship back to Rhodes laden with provisions. The Hospitaller council relaxed. Within weeks, however, a Macry corsair flotilla of 16 fustas put raiding parties ashore on Rhodes which torched the east coast villages of Arkhangelos, Pharaklos, and Kattavia, among others, and which took hundreds of captives destined for slave markets. A Knights flotilla consisting of three galleys, two fustas, a bark, and a privateer galleon belonging to Hospitaller Nicolo Turinco left Rhodes Town in pursuit. Commanded by Diogo d'Allmeida, Prior of Portugal, the Knights flotilla overtook the Turkish flotilla near Cape Kurtoglu (then yet unnamed) in the SW corner of the Gulf of Macry. During the engagement which followed two Turkish fustas went to the bottom and eight others broke up against an inhospitable shore. Thirty captive Rhodians were rescued. In one of the first recorded instances of friendly fire, however, a Knights incendiary ball struck a Knights galley killing fourteen. In an action as inconclusive as recent combat in this part of the world, the remainder of the Turkish flotilla retired to shelter in the shallow waters behind Macri Vecchia and the Knights flotilla returned to Rhodes. Both left dead and dieing behind, including many Rhodian captives. Now the moral of this story is not that princes have little control over pirates but rather that war of any kind results in senseless death and destruction. There is more to Turkish corsair and Knights history, of course, and more poet than prince to Korkut, too much more to recount here. But charter Schooner Sailing TurkeyKayhan 11. She can take you to all of the stops along the coastal routes of those Turkish corsairs and Hospitaller knights. Coastal routes by way of enchanting locales. Or in the other direction should you prefer to cruise southeast from Fethiye along the Lycian coast. Sailing the numerous tracks of still other corsairs who combed these waters throughout much of history. Perhaps sailing the tracks of a large flotilla assembled at Macry by the Ottoman Sultan Selim I, son of Beyazid II. As early as 1513 the new sultan, soon to be known as Selim The Grim, assembled at Macry a flotilla comprising 20 galleys and 30 fustas, most of them corsair vessels when not in Ottoman service. Preparing for war against the Safavid dynasty in Persia the sultan had also assembled at Macry a military contingent numbering 3,000. The flotilla and military contingent sailed southeast from there past Kalkan and through Kekova Roads to Finike before jumping off to Syria in 1515 where he made rendezvous with Ottoman armies, and to Mamluk Egypt in 1516. It was in these places that Selim put an end to both Safavids and Mamluks. You might charter Kayhan 11 to sail these corsair tracks as far as Kekova Roads. There you might inspect ancient Simena, ancient Teimiussa, and ancient Andriake. You might inspect the Byzantine castle at Simena built atop an ancient Lycian acropolis, or you might inspect tombs at Teimiussa including those depicted at right, or you might inspect the port at Andriake where the apostle Paul transshipped in AD 60 a prisoner en route to Rome. You see, it is almost impossible to escape history at the crossroads of history. Starting in Fethiye, do all of this and more aboard a charter schooner with an experienced crew able to show you the routes of local corsairs and of Selim The Grim, among others. Kayhan 11, a handsome crewed charter schooner sailing Turkey. Contact Charter Yachts Turkey today at cytcharter@aol.com